Xenia students learn about entrepreneurship


By Scott Halasz - shalasz@civitasmedia.com



Devin Dodge demos one of his items to prospective buyers. His group, including Jerriah Davis and Jake Jones, made speakers, cork key chains and coasters.


Gabriella Winegarner, Emma Johnson and Stephanie Patterson look over their sales tracker between customers. The trio made and sold wood letters and clay items.


Kaylee Benson and Sophie Robinson get excited about one of their items. They made dog beds, dog toys, doggie boxes and dog tags. Brody Hedger was also part of the group.


Kaitlyn Williams makes change for a customer whole Andrea Dobkins looks on. Their group made dishwasher magnets and duct tape creations. Tommy Michael and Colin Lorenz were also part of the group.


Chaton Doty counts his money after selling an item. Along with Luke Cushman and Kymari Sanford, Doty sold sock dolls, holiday cards and nail pendants.


Scott Halasz | Xenia Daily Gazette Kimi Conyers and Mason Rubio get ready to sell an item during the XTAR Project Showcase at Cox Elementary School Tuesday. The pair, along with Sincere Gleaton, made and sold necklaces, bows and sponge balls.


Allison Merriman is interviewed about her items by former Ohio State kicker Tim Williams, while Hannah Goffee looks on. The pair, along with Dallas Johnston, made hot handle holders, flower pots and spice racks. Williams went around to the various booths and provided them with “advertising” over the public address system.


XENIA — After completing a unit about entrepreneurship, Xenia fourth grader Ali Haley learned a big lesson.

“Producing goods and making a shop is much harder than it looks,” the Tecumseh Elementary School student said.

Hard work, but it was worth it for Haley and the rest of students in the Xenia Talented Academic Resource (XTAR) program, who culminated a year’s worth of learning about the business world with Tuesday’s XTAR Project Showcase.

The showcase enabled the 40-plus kids from throughout the district to show off and sell products they developed and manufactured from start to finish. The entrepreneurship and showcase used to be just a unit, but teacher Donna Shaw expanded it’s length to give the students more insight into being a business owner.

“That’s something we’ve done new this year,” Shaw said. XTAR partnered with Wright State, Anthony-Thomas Candy Company in Columbus and some other local businesses so the students could see all aspects of a business.

“We tried to focus on all things to do with it,” Shaw said.

The kids were split into 13 businesses, each charged with coming up with an item to sell. They had to develop it, obtain classroom financing, manufacture it and then pay back the loan after the sale. Some of the manufacturing, such as sewing, gluing, drilling and sawing, was contracted out to teachers and parents — for a fee.

The business owners then priced their items and sold them at the showcase for XTAR dollars. Prices ranged from $4-95 in XTAR money, with an exchange rate of $5 in U.S. currency for $25 in XTAR cash.

Haley, and partners Hayleigh Cleaver and Kyler Clevelle sold coasters and cinnamon ornaments.

“We were looking up online for creative ideas for kids (and) Ali found that,” Cleaver said. “It wasn’t very hard, but we had to put a lot of glue in it.”

Cleaver also learned a little about the financing part of a business.

“When you get a loan you have to repay it,” she said. “(And) you have to put some of your money into it.”

Among the more unique items were Mason soap jars, created by the team of Zoey Blake, Neil Chen and Dean Bogan.

“Have you ever dropped a plastic soap jar and are like ‘dang it?’ ” Blake said. The bottle could crack open, the lid could come off and rinsing it off is a mess.

But by putting the liquid soap into a Mason jar, the soap can withstand a drop a little better, she said.

“They hold a lot more,” Blake said. “It can hold two of the generic brands, and more.” They made 15 and were down to just one within a few minutes of the sale beginning.

“It was probably one of the easiest ones (to make),” Blake said.

Other items being hawked include dog beds, pipe cleaner creations, speakers, wood letters, dishwasher magnets, picture frames, wax paper paintings and spice racks.

Ten percent of the real money raised will be donated to 4 Paws for Ability. The rest will be spent on next year’s supplies and prizes for the most profitable company and for all companies which earned a profit.

Devin Dodge demos one of his items to prospective buyers. His group, including Jerriah Davis and Jake Jones, made speakers, cork key chains and coasters.
http://xeniagazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2420.jpgDevin Dodge demos one of his items to prospective buyers. His group, including Jerriah Davis and Jake Jones, made speakers, cork key chains and coasters.

Gabriella Winegarner, Emma Johnson and Stephanie Patterson look over their sales tracker between customers. The trio made and sold wood letters and clay items.
http://xeniagazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2422.jpgGabriella Winegarner, Emma Johnson and Stephanie Patterson look over their sales tracker between customers. The trio made and sold wood letters and clay items.

Kaylee Benson and Sophie Robinson get excited about one of their items. They made dog beds, dog toys, doggie boxes and dog tags. Brody Hedger was also part of the group.
http://xeniagazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2423.jpgKaylee Benson and Sophie Robinson get excited about one of their items. They made dog beds, dog toys, doggie boxes and dog tags. Brody Hedger was also part of the group.

Kaitlyn Williams makes change for a customer whole Andrea Dobkins looks on. Their group made dishwasher magnets and duct tape creations. Tommy Michael and Colin Lorenz were also part of the group.
http://xeniagazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2424.jpgKaitlyn Williams makes change for a customer whole Andrea Dobkins looks on. Their group made dishwasher magnets and duct tape creations. Tommy Michael and Colin Lorenz were also part of the group.

Chaton Doty counts his money after selling an item. Along with Luke Cushman and Kymari Sanford, Doty sold sock dolls, holiday cards and nail pendants.
http://xeniagazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2427.jpgChaton Doty counts his money after selling an item. Along with Luke Cushman and Kymari Sanford, Doty sold sock dolls, holiday cards and nail pendants.

Scott Halasz | Xenia Daily Gazette Kimi Conyers and Mason Rubio get ready to sell an item during the XTAR Project Showcase at Cox Elementary School Tuesday. The pair, along with Sincere Gleaton, made and sold necklaces, bows and sponge balls.
http://xeniagazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2419.jpgScott Halasz | Xenia Daily Gazette Kimi Conyers and Mason Rubio get ready to sell an item during the XTAR Project Showcase at Cox Elementary School Tuesday. The pair, along with Sincere Gleaton, made and sold necklaces, bows and sponge balls.

Allison Merriman is interviewed about her items by former Ohio State kicker Tim Williams, while Hannah Goffee looks on. The pair, along with Dallas Johnston, made hot handle holders, flower pots and spice racks. Williams went around to the various booths and provided them with “advertising” over the public address system.
http://xeniagazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2428.jpgAllison Merriman is interviewed about her items by former Ohio State kicker Tim Williams, while Hannah Goffee looks on. The pair, along with Dallas Johnston, made hot handle holders, flower pots and spice racks. Williams went around to the various booths and provided them with “advertising” over the public address system.

By Scott Halasz

shalasz@civitasmedia.com

Contact Scott Halasz at 937-502-4507.

Contact Scott Halasz at 937-502-4507.

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