Mock game show comes to CHS


Scott Halasz | Greene County News Host Zach Rubosky waits for an answer from Courtney Cyphers during Thursday’s Indian Rumble, Cedarville’s version of the popular TV game show “Family Feud.”


The crew of the Indian Rumble hard at work during Thursday’s event.


Zach Rubosky gives Kenzi Mimier a friendly embrace while she prepares to answers a question.


Members of the red team encourage the black team to give a wrong answer and get its third strike, signified by a red “X’ in a box.


Members of the technical communications class built the screen and designed the software for the Indian Rumble game. Shown, a team gets an answer wrong and receives its second strike.


Celeste Rucker plays “fast five,” the final part of the Indian Rumble game. Host Zach Rubosky asked five questions and Rucker tried to guess the most popular answer. The team needed 200 points to complete is successfully but scored 191.


Cedarville High School students cheer as the Indian Rumble contestants and host enter the gym.


By Scott Halasz

shalasz@civitasmedia.com

CEDARVILLE — Steve Harvey would be proud of what took place at Cedarville High School Thursday.

Students in the school’s technical communications class put on a production of “Indian Rumble,” based on the Harvey-hosted “Family Feud” game show, doing everything from writing the software to building the set and setting up the broadcast equipment. Eight high school students were chosen to be contestants and the personable Zach Rubosky acted as the host.

According to teacher Jason Siwek, the students came up with the idea for the rumble instead of a pep rally. Developing every aspect of the event gave the students practical experience of taking what they learn in the classroom and adapting it to real life. The production accurately mimicked the popular show — on TV since 1976 — in which contestants try to come up with the top answers to a series of questions.

If the contestants gave a correct answer, a video on a screen revealed where it ranked among the best answers. If an answer didn’t appear, a red “X” in a box flashed on a screen, much like the TV show. While the game was being played, Siwek’s students were busy running a video camera, revealing the answers and handling other aspects of a live TV performance. High school students watched the game being played live in the gym while a video was streamed to the rest of the district’s buildings.

“I thought it was pretty cool because I’ve never done something like this before,” said freshman Kaylee Cyphers, who was the video switcher for live streaming.

Senior Kristin Klimek was the host during practice sessions and quickly learned that when hosting she had to remember to involve the contestants.

“It was fun though,” she said.

One team consisted of Max Weimer, Wesley Williams, Celeste Rucker and Kenzi Mimer while the other team featured Chris Anderson, Courtney Cyphers, Maggie Coe and C.J. Pahl.

Mimer, who was on the winning team, signed up because she thought it would be fun and to support her fellow students.

“I think it’s pretty cool that they’re trying to do something better for the school,” she said. “Make it more fun.”

Anderson was the leader of the other team and also signed up because he thought it would be a memorable experience.

“I like having fun,” he said.

Even though he was on the losing team, Anderson ended up a winner as at the very end he asked Carley Jones to prom. She said yes, which was undoubtedly the No. 1 answer.

Scott Halasz | Greene County News Host Zach Rubosky waits for an answer from Courtney Cyphers during Thursday’s Indian Rumble, Cedarville’s version of the popular TV game show “Family Feud.”
http://xeniagazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_DSC_2158.jpgScott Halasz | Greene County News Host Zach Rubosky waits for an answer from Courtney Cyphers during Thursday’s Indian Rumble, Cedarville’s version of the popular TV game show “Family Feud.”

The crew of the Indian Rumble hard at work during Thursday’s event.
http://xeniagazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_DSC_2162.jpgThe crew of the Indian Rumble hard at work during Thursday’s event.

Zach Rubosky gives Kenzi Mimier a friendly embrace while she prepares to answers a question.
http://xeniagazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_DSC_2178.jpgZach Rubosky gives Kenzi Mimier a friendly embrace while she prepares to answers a question.

Members of the red team encourage the black team to give a wrong answer and get its third strike, signified by a red “X’ in a box.
http://xeniagazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_DSC_2181.jpgMembers of the red team encourage the black team to give a wrong answer and get its third strike, signified by a red “X’ in a box.

Members of the technical communications class built the screen and designed the software for the Indian Rumble game. Shown, a team gets an answer wrong and receives its second strike.
http://xeniagazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_DSC_2185.jpgMembers of the technical communications class built the screen and designed the software for the Indian Rumble game. Shown, a team gets an answer wrong and receives its second strike.

Celeste Rucker plays “fast five,” the final part of the Indian Rumble game. Host Zach Rubosky asked five questions and Rucker tried to guess the most popular answer. The team needed 200 points to complete is successfully but scored 191.
http://xeniagazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_DSC_2194.jpgCeleste Rucker plays “fast five,” the final part of the Indian Rumble game. Host Zach Rubosky asked five questions and Rucker tried to guess the most popular answer. The team needed 200 points to complete is successfully but scored 191.

Cedarville High School students cheer as the Indian Rumble contestants and host enter the gym.
http://xeniagazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_DSC_2151.jpgCedarville High School students cheer as the Indian Rumble contestants and host enter the gym.

Contact Scott Halasz at 937-502-4507.

Contact Scott Halasz at 937-502-4507.

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